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Congratulations on the new job offer you’ve accepted! This is a big step and you’re very excited about your new position at a new company – now it’s time to tell your boss. They may be happy for you, understanding, angry, shocked, or even offer you a counter offer. Now, before you accept your shiny new counter offer we’d like to tell you why it’s probably not the best idea.

Welcome to the Dark Side – more often than not when you tell your current employer about your new job offer and you receive a counter offer from them, you will be replaced. Your loyalty will be questioned and you will no longer be a part of the inner circle. When your boss offers you a counter offer it’s typically in a state of panic. They cannot afford to lose you at this time and will do whatever it takes to keep you around – that is until they find a replacement for you.


Here are a few extra things to think about while considering:

  1. Why did you leave?

    Let’s think back to when you decided you were going to begin exploring your options and apply for new jobs… Why did you decide to look for a new job? Was it being unhappy, the company culture, your boss, conflict within the organization? You decided to leave for a reason and a counter offer will not fix the problem.

  2. It’s okay to leave.

    Do not let your boss guilt trip you into staying or win you over with a counter offer. If you are ready for a change or have outgrown your current job – it’s okay to move on.

  3. Do not use your new position as leverage for a raise.

    If you are happy in your current position but would like a pay-raise – ask for one. Using a new job offer as leverage for a pay-raise is never a good idea. If you feel you are worth more, negotiate a new salary.

  4. You only have a counter offer because you were resigning.

    Don’t get too excited with your new package just yet. Why did it take you announcing your resignation to get a raise and a few extra benefits? You were only offered a counter offer because you were planning to resign – and odds are your company is not in a position to lose you.


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